Love and Cannabis 0009: Tanshins Bill S8191#01

Aiden Stephen suffers from a severe form of epilepsy causing him to have over 100 seizures per day. He was diagnosis as an infant and fortunately CBD helps substantially reduce his seizures. He was one of the youngest patients in NYS to receive a medical marijuana card and he is treated by a doctor who prescribes the medicine. On his first day of kindergarten the school nurse refused to administer his medicine. Nina and Osiris would not accept this and contacted their elected officials and ultimately created a Bill in the NYS Senate. Today's episode is the story of Tanshins Bill S8191#01

*Produced By MJBulls Media | Cannabis Podcast Network*

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Dan Humiston:
For too many years, families of children with devastating illnesses felt helpless as they watched their child suffer. Today, they're taking matters into their own hands and finally, finding relief. Treating No Child with Cannabis. This is one family's story.

Nina Simmons & Osiris Stephen:
Welcome to another episode of Love and Cannabis. I am Nina Simone and I am Osiris Stephen and we are the proud parents of Aiden Stephen.

Osiris Stephen:
Hey, all, welcome to another episode. I just wanted to thank you guys for listening in. We've been getting a lot of positive feedback. People are saying, hey, great episodes, really interested. Thank you very much for putting that information out, whatever the episode may be, because it kind of hits home for them. And pretty much that's really our goal is to share our experiences because we know we know we're not the only one going through it and it really inspires us to keep going.

Osiris Stephen:
Exactly. So thanks for listening.

Nina Simmons:
Yes. Thank you very much.

Osiris Stephen:
Today's episode is about Tanshine, Bill, as 81 91. How did we get to that? I mean, we're just everyday people. All of a sudden now we've got a bill with our son's name on it in New York state, Albany, waiting to be, I guess, review it again. I'm still confused about what is holding things up. It's been almost it's been about a year, almost a year and a half. Two years now. Yes. And since they've actually looked at it, put on hold and still waiting to review it because they're waiting for some information. So we're going to share that story and what led up to it and then also get into where it is now and what's expected.

Nina Simmons:
His act, so we're going to give you some backdrop. So we were so fortunate that Angel was able to attend pre-K in Harlem. It was a full day program at that time. It was getting to CBD three times a day.

Nina Simmons:
A morning, afternoon and evening.

Nina Simmons:
Those two of you were going to attend school full time.

Nina Simmons:
He would need to get his CBD. Med school. He had a nurse that was with him on the bus and a private and a nurse that was with him specifically for him in the classroom. So we're all excited. We packed up his meds and everything to give to the nurse. And I remember. That morning, the nurse was looking at the magic. OK. And she said, what is this? I said, oh, does this CBD?

Nina Simmons:
She was like, no, I can't give that out. I'm saying, well, we have a prescription. I see. She goes, Oh, no, I can't give that out. I said, OK. So I called her supervisor and she said, no, we can't give it out. And she came with this whole excuse. How was the federal legal? We can't give it out.

Osiris Stephen:
Plaza BLOCK, despite the fact that he has a medical marijuana card, probably one of the few would have children. The first child in New York state to have a medical marijuana card.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. So we had every documentation using a Cannabis doctor. He has epilepsy diagnosis. We thought, you know, it was mainstream that, you know, CBT helps with seizures and well known, well documented. But that wasn't enough. So then. I emailed the New York State Nursing Board. God, we can we just say. Me and this person got and a lot of back and forth, a lot of firm, strong emails were sent to make a long story short, the answer was no, they gave. I'm not going again to all the reasons why they said no, but a lot of it was it wasn't FDA approved.

Nina Simmons:
I think it was more personal than some of it seemed like it was more personal opinion. Yes, that's what it was, really.

Nina Simmons:
So the nurse wouldn't do it. So we're like, okay, what are we going do? Cause we knew he needed three times a day.

Osiris Stephen:
Yeah. And then we started seeing the benefits. So it was important for him to get it. And so that kind of put us in like hyper mode and basically anxious because we're like trying to figure out how is this gonna work? Especially the fact that we both worked in distant areas from the school and where he was attending. So I decided to make the decision like, okay, I will go leave work to administer it. So I had to travel about 40 minute 30.

Osiris Stephen:
I would say 30 minutes one way from my job, get to a school, which was another 10, 15 minutes to get there administered as CBd, then turn around, hop back and get to my job.

Nina Simmons:
And, you know, I'm like, this is not seeing. Right. It wasn't sustainable business. But yeah, I mean, this is not fair that my son needs this. Yeah. Participate in school.

Osiris Stephen:
You have to go to school. Yeah, exactly. What's so crazy is that he can get the Depakote, he can get the old if he does also those pharmaceutical drugs that could become very addictive and then have the crazy side effects. He can get those with no problem on the bus, off the bus, in the school bus, something as a plant. That's natural. No. Because of an outdated law.

Nina Simmons:
Exactly. So I I was I what are we gonna do? So we started doing some research and we saw that there was a few states that had some laws in place that allow for it that allowed the administration of CBD in schools.

Osiris Stephen:
One of them was Maine and New Jersey, Maine, New Jersey. What was the other way? There was a third one. I think it was D.C.. No, but that's a district once in D.C.. I'm not sure. But there was a third was a third one year.

Nina Simmons:
So we're like, whoa, New Jersey, while that you know, that close. That's really close.

Nina Simmons:
So how come we're behind the times and we don't have any laws in place? So what can we do?

Osiris Stephen:
I said, why don't we come up with a bill, which is true or even I think also I think where you start is like besides getting a bill like, let's talk to our politicians first and see what we can do. Exactly. So we started local. You started locally.

Nina Simmons:
So what can we do? Because this is not Aiden. It's not going to be the only student with this issue.

Nina Simmons:
Yet, as it was getting more popular, we knew that this is not going to be just for for other kids as well. It's just not fair. Yeah.

Osiris Stephen:
I only think I would name it popular. I think it's the more awareness that people are realizing that actually I could use this to treat my child. So haven't worked in what fit? I had 15 years experience working in school, so I've seen children. I could have benefited from it. And you're currently working in schools, so you see the kids that could benefit from you can benefit from CBD was obviously like eventually. This is going to be something where kids are going to be going to school and they go to the nurse and they're gonna be needing their CCD or some function. So I thought I was like, let's jump ahead.

Nina Simmons:
And is down now only for eight for other kids, because I'm thinking, imagine your child needed their nebulizer or that for their asthma and they couldn't get it.

Nina Simmons:
How how unfair is that? How scary is that? How scary. Some kids need their CBd to stop seizures.

Nina Simmons:
You know, as a rescue med like this is not fair. And everybody every child has a right to go to school.

Nina Simmons:
So the mayor de Blasio was having a town hall meeting.

Nina Simmons:
And I'm not the type of person to really go to this type of thing. No, I really have them. You know, as I say, you know what? He's our mayor. He's having a meeting. He needs to know that this is going on.

Osiris Stephen:
And I was like, go get him, girl.

Osiris Stephen:
I'll stay home and go, go. And I think given how to do it, give them hell.

Nina Simmons:
So I went to the meeting, the town hall meeting, and everyone posed a question.

Nina Simmons:
Well, it was a long. It went all like four hours. But I stay to the end.

Nina Simmons:
I wasn't called to pose a question to the mayor, but I said, let me just stay at the end at least two and maybe I can somehow get a picture, somehow something.

Nina Simmons:
So I did. And at the end, I went line up for a picture as I was taking the picture. I told them, I said, hey, this was going on.

Nina Simmons:
My son, we're in District 5 in Manhattan and he has CBD, the CBD in school.

Nina Simmons:
What can you do to help us? This doesn't seem fair.

Osiris Stephen:
And surprisingly, he was really receptive. Wow. That's that's funny. He was extremely, extremely receptive. He said, OK. Wow. This seems like an issue. Public health issue. He mentioned was like, yeah, I said, let me get your e-mail. And then he said, I'm going to e-mail. So and so. And that pushes you be getting back to you.

Osiris Stephen:
And they did. Wow. Wow. That was amazing that anybody because you sent me a text. We picture you took go with the blouse. I'm like, oh, my God. Yeah. He's really like, OK, this when I had the courage and actually something came out of it. Yeah. It was Dena. was crazy soon after that. I believe Senator Gillibrand was speaking in Brooklyn at the time. And I was like, I am going to corner her. I took Aiden with me and a friend of mine. We went out there and for somebody positive to come out and speak. They usually like to do the backdoor exit soon. And, you know, it's speaking. So after you had met with Senator, then I said, I'm sorry. With Mayor de Blasio, you had the conversation and then you had also with. So, yes, that as well.

Nina Simmons:
And I spoke with de Blasio. I knew that this had to be more on a local level.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. So I said, let me talk to the senator from my district, which it was Brian Benjamin. Yeah. We saw Brian Benjamin.

Nina Simmons:
So I couldn't get directly to him. But then I spoke to his chief of staff and we exchanged emails.

Nina Simmons:
And after that, I just kept emailing or emailing her and calling the office, emailing her again. She never got back to me. So then we saw that our senator was having a community town hall meeting again. Yeah, I told Cyrus about it and I said, I'll be there.

Osiris Stephen:
This is a win, is it? What time? I'll be there. And it was interesting because I'm like, OK. I went there dressed. And so we're sitting. I think they had rented out a I think they were using a hospital floor. They were using a room from the hospital. I guess the space for the town hall meeting. So I'm sitting there. Listen, everybody, as they come up and speak, most of the part of what the general public we're talking about was the usual things needing security in the project areas, needing more police presence or security cameras, more lighting. The other issue was the rent was too high. That was one of their concerns or basically garbage being not being picked up. So it was my turn. And I stood up. I said, what are you going to do about kids needing medical marijuana in schools to deal with epilepsy or any kind of ailment?

Osiris Stephen:
I think everybody that was sitting there, because most of them were elderly, turned around, looked at me like, what the F is he talking about? They literally looked at me like, oh, like what? That everybody has this problem. But says they looked at me and looking back, I'm like, yeah, I'm very serious. The senator said, Oh, yeah. Oh, yes. I have to talk to you. Leary looked at me, said I, yes, I have to talk to ice. I spoke to your wife. Yes. He looked at his chief asset. Get his number, please talk to. Well, we'll sidebar this literally to stop this episode, right? That's not it. The crazy thing is all at all. You met my wife, but yet you never responded. So now it's a I basically is now is I?

Osiris Stephen:
So after everything was done, the chief of staff had came by, spoke to me, said, yes, your wife heard. I have spoken with say I'm a here's my number. Let's schedule a time and talk. I said not a problem. Definitely. Come on and see you and the senator. Eventually I went over to him and they introduced myself. We talked briefly and he said, yes, please, let's make an appointment. Come see us. And that was the beginning that got us on the ball rolling forward. But soon after that conversation, I was like I stated before I attended another town hall meeting where Senator Gillibrand was there and I was able to get on stage, speak to her. Take a picture with aid in the hand. And she got to meet him soon after that. That meeting was over. She knows she had went out the back door. Didn't really since that was an opportunity for me to talk to her in depth about what the issue was and what we're facing. And she said, well, let's schedule a meeting with my people in the city because she would be in D.C. and she really couldn't get involved because she's at the federal level. So I said I understood. But she and she knew and she heard and she wanted to support any way she could. And that was very that was very important just for her to have the ear and give me that moment to listen to myself and take a picture with it as well. So we do have a picture of actually when she came back to New York the following year. We took another picture. She remembered age like, oh, my God, look, he's also grown up.

Osiris Stephen:
It was it was really good and really kind of cool to say, Senator, enough to get you to say this kid is 6 and he's like a senator, a state senator, a local. It is a journey in half. But it was just the beginning.

Nina Simmons:
So we knew when we. Well, can I meet with local Santa? And we had to have a game plan of what we were going to say. Yes. We had a pan pan. OK, we gotta give statistics. Yes, we have to give examples. So it was great that New Jersey already had something in place. So we gave New Jersey as an example.

Nina Simmons:
We gave a plan of action. Yes. So we had to have everything all set because we like you know, we. We don't want to go there and not be prepared.

Osiris Stephen:
And that's pretty much what they want, is that they want things prepay that gets premade, that prepaid. But premade in the sense for them to look over and then have their people look it over. And if anything else, rewrite the language so it fits, especially something like this. When we originally, Brooke, decided to put the bill together will soon be called Aiden's bill. But then I did some research and realized that there was another bill in New York state name it is Bill. It was for a child that had died from a I guess some sort of religion had a disease. Yeah. And I did not want to take anything away from that by creating under the bill under a name.

Osiris Stephen:
So I use a his middle name, which is Tanshins, which was given to him by a dear friend of mine who is a she was a female Buddhist priest, one of the few in this world. And she touches means secret of truth.

Osiris Stephen:
And I thought this was really appropriate. It was so apropos for this. What we're going through the secret of truth. And then we're referring to this plan, you know, so we call it Touches Bill. And it was titled as eighty one ninety one. And that bill basically laid out that the school would create a policy that would allow for someone to be a caregiver assigned to aid and whether would be what a teacher or nurse or even the principal or someone someone administrate love, but someone would be able to administer his CBD while either in school or off campus at an end in an event.

Nina Simmons:
So, yeah. So it was something to protect them. Exactly. So let's backdrop to the day of the meeting. So we got a meeting with the Santa. So we we got dressed up with suit and tie, ready to go pro.. OK, so we got there and we're in this. His office. Yeah, you're reading. We got the meeting in his office. We gave all the information that we actually present a copy of the bill Jose has.

Osiris Stephen:
So they had some it was New Jersey may join me. Yeah, it was. Also, we has help from other people, too, from other states who are also preparing to say their states, one from South Carolina, another one from Colorado. And there was another father out in Washington state. Yes. So we have all these examples. Mm hmm.

Nina Simmons:
Why didn't you include so at the end of the meeting, he said, yeah, he's disappointed.

Nina Simmons:
I'll support it. I'll check. Gets on. So at that kid, you don't. So that also this bill riders. Yeah. We didn't we didn't write the bill. They we gave what we gave input but they had bill riders.

Nina Simmons & Osiris Stephen:
Yes. Shout out to Phil. Yeah.

Nina Simmons:
Phil they have the bill riders so they would keep us posted. How is this along? It's a lengthy process, but they kept us posted on all the steps. They asked for our feedback on the language. Yes, true.

Osiris Stephen:
They did e-mails back when they did complete it. They say, what do you think? What do you think we should add?

Osiris Stephen:
What should we do with this part simultaneously? Senator Savino, I understand you had heard Bill as well. She was a strong proponent. And God bless her, cause she really pushed a lot into the medical marijuana program and what she added. So it was awesome.

Osiris Stephen:
She.

Osiris Stephen:
Had didn't have a role in our bill. But at the same time, because of the things that she was doing, it kind of helped us design a bill that we were we put together.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. So it was it was great. I mean, I remember it well, we laugh.

Nina Simmons:
It was a great experience. I would say that we were grateful for that.

Nina Simmons:
Oh, my God. Kennedy just did that. Yeah. No, no. When we got home, we like we just met with a state senator. Oh, my God.

Osiris Stephen:
Like, how often does that happen? When does that happen? It was it was a lot to take in all this was a lot. You know, we went from hate to use the word normal people, but we I don't think our life was normal.

Nina Simmons:
So I would not leave me. And everyday people just going to do. We did it, Neil.

Nina Simmons:
We we saw something that wasn't right, at least trying to make a career. We tried to. Yeah. We said this is not right. This is not acceptable. And we had the, you know, the courage to to say something.

Osiris Stephen:
Jack, if this is not that easy, really takes courage because you're literally changing how you think your life should be.

And putting into another path that you did not even think about was even in line in what you wanted, because you just want t your child. You just want to have your family go to work, come home, pay your bills. You know, just be the everyday person. But now you're thrusted into his role. Like this is for my son and sons like him or children like him who may not have that parent who's the who was able to commit to that time to do these things because they don't know where to start. They don't know who to reach out to. They don't know how to get even in the mindset of doing something like this that we're doing. And it was amazing.

Nina Simmons:
It was amazing because I wasn't, you know, ways to do that. It's Helen says, no, a higher figure is no. I said not me. There's no saying. I think there was a difference between. Yes, I was. There was no. They knew it was OK.

Osiris Stephen:
No, I was like that accepting the no because it wasn't right. You know. Yeah, well that's exactly it. It wasn't right. And I think that's what made us want to push us further because it just did not sit right with us. Whether, you know, you saying, you know, who knows? No, that's how he raise. But this part of you says, you know what? This doesn't feel right. This is not how our lives or anyone's life should be, where we accept things in the way they are, especially when it's not something that's beneficial to us or our child, especially when we're struggling in our child's drug. We need the support. We need to really change things, especially when we see is going to be changing anyway. Why not now?

Nina Simmons:
Exactly. And when you go to a hospital and I've worked in a hospital before, you see these patients really doped up on very high doses of chemo, tossing dope and drugs. Yeah. And the nurses can give it out. Yes. No, you know, dish it out. . All right.

Nina Simmons:
Even some of these things can cause these patients to be addicted. That's crazy. But they can give it out. No problem.

Nina Simmons & Osiris Stephen:
They can get around schools, right? Yeah. Anyway, that's absurd. That's absurd. And yet we're talking about a plant. Right. But we're talking about a plant for. Exactly.

Nina Simmons:
This is nuts. So it just doesn't seem. It just doesn't seem right.

Osiris Stephen:
But for the most part, I mean, we really thought about not just our family, but other families behind us that were going through this. So we had our first press conference. It was a month before they went in to. What is that? I guess they were sessions. They went to sessions. So was it April? So we had the press conference. This was really interesting. So we went to a press conference. We're outside in front of city hall. We had the media there. It was if it was crazy. Big ups shouts at all the people that came out to support us. Yes. Shira, my family, my brother Gary, my sister Bailey in mice. You know who I mean? There were so many people, Jake and Joyce. It was amazing to see the support that we got. And then the I guess the media coverage you got was Channel Five, Channel Eleven. We even had a radio station that cover that interview was. And. This was what's really telling and tells you to kind of disconnect that's going on that's out there politically. It was, but I think the press conference was supposed to start sometime around 11:00 a.m. 30. So it rolled over to 12:00 and it was basically dosage time from 8:00. So as I pull up a bottle of CBD oil to administered aid. As the senator came over, he said, OK, so what do you do? Because we really need to get this press conference going moving forward. I said I had to administer the CBD right now. I remember this. Yeah. And so here's why. Because what's that? I said this is medicine. Give me medicine. That's like that's a CBD Oikos. Is this what we're fighting about it?

Osiris Stephen:
I said, yes, ma'am. I'm thinking like what you think it was like. What? I'm a pull out of blood. Yeah, baby. For him. I think he did. Yeah. Yeah. You know, so he's like, really?

Osiris Stephen:
This is what we find. And I'm like, yes, this is absurd.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. And then he got really late. Yeah. He got really funny. So he got a camera and went, oh.

Nina Simmons:
Because it basically looks like, you know, you have kids, it basically looks like you're giving like some type of Tylenol. Is it a syringe is a liquid. Liquid form. So he's like, this is it. That's it. That's all he kept saying. Is that okay? Let me say you do it. Let me say it. Yes. He's open. He pulled it out in. Open his mouth. And that was it. That was no biggie.

Osiris Stephen:
And he was this shot. I think it was just disbelief that this is what we're finding out. You know it. I guess that's what I'm trying to say. Like the disconnect or the misunderstood or the stigma and those years of prohibition. Gave him the idea, like most people would just sit around trying to get high and we're doing the same thing with a child. But he was willing to support us, never knowing or never seen how we have as soon as he acts. He believed his son by being like this was some very good but crazy but good. But we appreciate it. But at a press conference, it opened up all kinds of other things that went on for us. I mean, it was a whirlwind of activities. I mean, literally were attending events, local stay and speaking engagements. Yeah, it was crazy because one of these two is like when one of the few. Families of color that's involved. Yes. This deeply in the sense of political, social and having a child out there and not hiding and being fearful by stigmas about it.

Osiris Stephen:
Exactly. You know, it was a big deal. Yeah, it was. Even our families were like everybody was shock. Yeah.

Nina Simmons & Osiris Stephen:
Like, this is how I ask you, don't do this. Is going to be like, I saw you. How many phone calls it takes? We got. I saw you on TV. Oh, my God. And I went back to work to you. Thank you.

Nina Simmons:
And to feel like we're you. Yeah. Yeah.

Osiris Stephen:
It was interesting. And soon after, Huffington Post reached out to us and they found out about us through. So I. You think.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. Cannabis that day I think was at Cannabis.

Osiris Stephen:
Yes. Dr. Tune, Janelle. Thank you, Dr. Chen. Thank you. So Huffington Post did a special on us. And I think that not just on us, but other families that are using Cannabis to treat a child for a certain ailment. And it was titled Children Who Need Cannabis to Survive to Survive. It's an extreme title, but understandable.

Nina Simmons:
It is the truth, though. It does. It isn't true. There's even a day of hell. You know it definitely for the reality of it.

Osiris Stephen:
They stayed with us for a whole day or a whole day. They were with us. And ironically, they caught Asian aid and having a seizure like soon as they came and they were with us from what it was like 645 a.m. until like 5:00 pm.

Osiris Stephen:
The rest of the day they went to the school. They got to see him in activities. But they did also get to see the CBd work because as soon as he woke up around 7:00, you know, he sit at the table where they have breakfast. You'll see the videos on. It's on YouTube. It's on Huffington Post. Web site lists in America is also on our page as well.

Osiris Stephen:
Facebook is had over most close to 5 million views, I think was about four to half four million views already. So it was astonishing because it took us some time to actually watch it. I think it took me about three to four days to really watch it and think it took you about a week to a week and a half to watch a video, because when you're living through this, you don't realize what's going on. You're just going through the days. But then when somewhat presented to you and have you watch it. It's heartbreaking. It was heartbreaking. I think I cried a couple of times as I watched it. In fact, I had to watch it in pieces. Because it was really that hard because they realized, oh, my God, this is my life. This is our life. This is our journey. You know? I don't know. I don't know what I would be doing right now if this wasn't the case, if I wasn't going through Aiden's journey, because it is his journey, which is boy along for the ride and we're pretty much setting things up for his future because we don't know what it's gonna be, but we know what we need to do. And that's really protect and support him in any way we can.

Nina Simmons:
Exactly. So it is all of a sudden we become like these social justice advocate and it is empowered us to actually be become become fighters. So we don't we know if you speak up as you can, you can make change.

Nina Simmons:
I never really, truly believe that until now. You just have to speak up. And you have. We were from all this experience. We got empowered. Yes. And it's so important that I became empowered. And it helps us and other things and other aspects of our lives, not even just, you know, where our Cannabis advocacy.

Osiris Stephen:
Is that how to you know it?

Osiris Stephen:
And one of things I walked away with. Now, Katie, to walk with not even walk away with what Katie to walk with is that I question things when things just don't sit right with them like I'm not it accept this. I'm a question it especially when it has to do with my son, especially when deals are family and what we think that we need to in order to assure his health, his ability to succeed and those things that he needs in order to achieve certain goals, especially when you're in school. It's you know, you're dealing with those. The O T, which is your occupational therapies, your special are your special ed instructor. You're a speech therapist, you're a physical therapist. And they're doing certain things. They're like, no, you're not giving him the chances they need you, not giving them the proper tools or you be inadequate in what you're doing. You can question him. You could actually pose him, say, hey, look, I would like to see these things happen. I want you to do these things. Let's open up the dialogue so it's not one sided. And it's the same thing with doctors, too. When we go to a doctor's visit, it's like we're being trespassing. Look, I saw this I CBD oil. You're either with us or against us or we're just not having this conversation at all. And for the most part, they've been working with us. And that is yes, that's very powerful because before it was always, again, a one sided conversation because they were the authorities, they were the professionals. This is what they know.

Nina Simmons:
Exactly. So he definitely learned a lot from this experience. Definitely.

Osiris Stephen:
And I know you enjoy sharing because I know there's a lot of families out there and parents who are in the same situation and they don't know. And sometimes a second guess themselves. Look, if you're questioning it, you know, there's something not right. Push the issue. Research, be it advocate beyond understanding. And I think a lot of it comes from education. When you can have those conversations because you have to prove something. And so that puts you in a position because you're working to protect your child, your family and your rights. So there are other avenues to that.

Osiris Stephen:
Listen to this in the fact that now you we're getting more involved in our community. We're also getting involved in our school.

Osiris Stephen:
Exactly. So we've got side of our PTA members now. Yes. So we're like, oh, no, this is wrong. We've got to be PTA. We had to do this. Not only that, but we were also coaching t ball. Yeah.

Osiris Stephen:
So I was the manager. And you were my. One of my coaches.

Nina Simmons:
Assistant coaches. Yeah. It was like, what are we doing? Our is playing t ball. He has epilepsy, but he's the best hitter on the team.

Nina Simmons & Osiris Stephen:
I think it was a good team. Not to say you got to take anything away from the team.

Osiris Stephen:
But our son was like. And I think again, it goes back to our last episode when we talk about neuroplasticity. Mm hmm. That we wanted to break it.

Nina Simmons:
I I got to see that. Exactly. You know, we also we want to help aging, but then we also want to help other kids. Yeah. So this whole thing is like helping our community. Got to help our schools is as not all about your son a year.

Osiris Stephen:
Kids is a leader in that. Yeah, well it is. But everybody because we've met so many families that are share that are expressing the same things we are, but not as vocal or involved as we are. And I think that since they've spoken to us here, I was very dark stories. They hear what we've been doing the like, again, empowers them to say, oh, wow, you guys are doing all this. They're taking it back because, like we said, it's not something that we think we would be doing. But for them, it's like something that now they think, hey, I can do this.

Nina Simmons:
Exactly. I can try this and try it. No, they're not. It's OK to speak up. Yeah.

Nina Simmons:
There was an issue at my son's school where there was trash on the playground. And I said, you need to call your local senator.

Nina Simmons:
I'm like, yeah. They never thought about that. Let me call Parks and Recreation. To make a few phone calls. Do you like what I'm like?

Nina Simmons:
I just I just feel empowered. I know you have to speak up. Do you. Do you have to speak out there?

Osiris Stephen:
There is so many things out there.

Osiris Stephen:
Well, we're gonna to touch base on another another aspect, something that's close to home that I had to go up to orbit in disguise because. It's going to affect my child's and backed off family and how it got us to where we are now. So that's another story that's going to be another episode when you get into a dog. I hate to be vague about it, but it is a sensitive issue. So there's two sides to every story, as they say. But for the most part, I mean, this plant has empowered us. And that's why we say our motto is be strong and stay empowered.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, know, that's the big thing. But thanks for tuning in. I think that is it. You think this is it? It's so much more effort than I was.

Osiris Stephen:
So much more. But we do appreciate you guys listening in. And if you guys have any questions, feel free to shoot us an email or a quick text because you know who we are. And if you'll find us also on Facebook as well. But we will follow up with that bill itself, because right now we're still is still hovering in the air, uncertain.

Osiris Stephen:
One of the things that we heard from another senator is that his best to take whatever portions that we need from the bill that we feel that's most important and added to another bill that's already in place, which would be easier to pass than to do a standalone bill. I'm okay with that. But then again, a part of me is not OK with it.

Osiris Stephen:
But I'll see. Well, we'll see. We'll see. But this it's still it's still opening up, I think, here. Well, there was a there was a follow up. One of the things that they were concerned about when I spoke to the chief of staff of the center was that has any schools have felt any repercussions from the federal government? In a sense of funding because that they're allowing medical marijuana on campuses?

Osiris Stephen:
As of now, I have not heard any. And I think that's what was the issue.

Nina Simmons:
Although had to hold up with the bill now is that they don't want to put schools in a position where they may lose federal funding.

Nina Simmons:
Yes, because it gets CBD is still federally illegal, but that doesn't make sense because it's the funding that they get is for programs. So they don't want results. But the. But I'm saying it's not like the program. The funding is to go towards students in the school. But as for education towards drugs, like don't use drugs. Drug policies or programs. Right. That's my understanding. So it's really. How are they using their funding then? Are they using to subsidize other things? That could be some. That's a whole other ball.

Nina Simmons:
Yes. Now, that was their rationale for the bill not passing as a yes. So we'll keep you posted.

Osiris Stephen:
So. Yeah. Yeah. That places you're seeing.

Osiris Stephen:
So if you guys know anything, please share. If you know in these states out there that may have been affected by this, by them along in something like three or four states. So it's not that hard. Oh, OK. That has allowed medical marijuana on campus or CBD on campus to be administered. But thanks, guys, for listening in and we appreciate you guys. Enjoy the rest of your week and stay strong and stay empowered.

Thanks for tuning in. Another episode of Cannabis. I'm Osiris Stephen and I'm Nina Simmons Be strong and empowering.

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