Love and Cannabis 0007: Managing postpartum depression with cannabis

After giving birth to their son Aiden, Nina Simons suffered from postpartum depression. She learned that this very common and often misdiagnosed condition impacts over 13% of women for up to one year after giving birth. Osiris Stephen talks about how as a husband he felt helpless & confused, Doctors are have great success precribing cannabis to their postpartum patients.

*Produced By MJBulls Media | Cannabis Podcast Network*

LC0007 F.mp3 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

LC0007 F.mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Dan Humiston:
For too many years, families have children with devastating illnesses felt helpless as they watched their child suffer. Today, they're taking matters into their own hands and finally, finding relief. Treating their child with Cannabis. This is one family's story.

Nina Simons & Osiris Stephen:
Hi. Thanks for tuning in to another episode of Love and Cannabis.

Nina Simons & Osiris Stephen:
I am Nina. Osiris and we are the proud parents of A and so last week we said we're going to talk about postpartum depression and the use of Cannabis, huh?

Osiris Stephen:
But before we get to that, can I just interrupt real quick? OK, I just wanted to tell everyone about a great weekend we had. We went away for a family trip. We do this annually with another family, friends that we have. Robert s Robert, we were at the Hershey Park for two and a half days, you could say. And we had a fabulous time. No stress, no worries. It's just the family just relaxing, enjoying the weather. And also, you know, I had to give big ups to Aiden, who had an awesome time. You know, despite that, he had one of two triggers, seizures here and there. But it did not stop him from going on the rides. He was so ecstatic in between his screaming, you know, as soon as he got authorized. Yeah, baby, I think that's going to be the mantra. They're going to move forward with a zero baby, because this little guy, I mean, he's such a trooper and I have to give him so much love and credit for, you know, for him just stepping up and just being like, you know what, we're gonna have fun. And he did you know, he did great. Yeah. He loves swimming. That was one of things. He was loving being a pool. Even if it was cold, he stayed in the pool swimming. You know, he had his vest on. So. And, you know, for some families out there were kids who have some disabilities or some issue. Sometimes, you know, you can't do certain things with them. And that's why I just like I love the fact that Aiden does not give up, you know, and trying to do certain things and, you know, certain activities think that you shouldn't be doing. And sometimes we wonder like, oh, we pushed this get too far.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. Oh, yes. Well, just had to see what he's still going. Okay. Let's just keep going. Yeah.

Osiris Stephen:
And so I just love him and his tenacity and just, you know, his spirit to just keep going, just having fun no matter what. And swimming with him and watching him play and just get excited. It's just it's awesome.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, exactly. Inspires us. You know, and no matter what he's going through, he just wants to have fun. He can have a quick little seizure and he's back on having fun like nothing happened. And just elaborate on what I'm saying he was saying. So even is basically tall enough now to go on most roller coasters.

Nina Simmons:
But he's still really thin. So it is a little scary. We can get on and we're on that.

Nina Simmons:
We keep you on a roller coaster. He'll scream his head off like someone's killing him.

Osiris Stephen:
Oh, God. Don't say that too loud. But it didn't get reported. But then at the end, at the end, when it's over, he goes.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, baby. Oh, okay.

Osiris Stephen:
Like this kid is really amped up for the ride. Even when we went to Disney and we went on some heavy rides and he is Space Mountain. Yeah. And this was his first time really on a roll. I think that was the first time on a lot of girls. Yeah. The kid was like, oh my God, does this? Looks like he's like, wait for the next one. And we got I mean, we got some hairy rise. Even I had to be like, he was like, yeah, my OK, this kid is a trooper, so. Yes, yeah. I hang out with him any time. So. Yep, big up to Aiden. Thanks for being a good sidekick. When it comes to going on the rides.

Nina Simmons:
Yes. Okay. Let's get back to the topic. So we're going to talk about postpartum depression, which you to explain to me, though, because a lot that is. Yes. So basically thesis being the coming as onset of, I guess, some sadness after a month, two a year after you have a baby.

Nina Simmons:
And that can look very different to different people. Some people are just a little sad feeling. They have some mothers cry uncontrollably. Some mothers have it to the point where they lose their appetite or they some can even be around the baby.

Osiris Stephen:
I've heard stories about that. You know, parents can't be around, you know, the mothers. That's so much. But the mothers can't really help the child, let alone themselves. They get felt isolated. Is there, Kathleen, jittery? Nervous is just like this. Overwhelming emotions all the time. Is that what the case this time is? I wonder if you've experienced it. Have you? Because I know we've talked about you mentioned it and I know that on times you talk about depression, is it like almost similar in a way or is it?

Nina Simmons:
Yes. I what I think is happening is that a lot of moms are going through it, but not really realizing this. I mean, there's nothing that they're read, but it's like in hindsight, like, oh, maybe I was suffering from this.

Nina Simmons:
There was an article in Housekeeping magazine that said that 13 percent of mothers go through this postpartum depression, but they think that may be even more than that because it's only the mothers who actually seek out help.

Nina Simmons:
And it's actually reporting it. OK. So I do think that it probably is more and I did go through it for sure. In hindsight. You do. But wow. Yeah, I was going through that. But in the time here, not thinking, is this what it is or should I go get help for it?

Osiris Stephen:
Oh, that's interesting because I believe. Do you think a moment of a woman having a child that's like a point of happiness, joy, overwhelming.

Osiris Stephen:
Husband, you know, the father, the towel is like, oh my God, we're having good. And yet the mothers like feeling guilt and all these emotional stressors that are coming over over them and they feel overwhelming. I mean, me as a husband, I'm like, I don't know what to do. I don't know how to help you when I had to help the child. So it's like, you know, it like this juggling act of what do you do?

Osiris Stephen:
You know, for for guys like, what do we do? Do we just stand by and wait for it? Does, you know, go away or is it something that we can verbally say or something physical we can do? And not really, because it's all in your mind.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, I don't know. Was that in our mind making things up? But we is definitely a physical feeling. Yeah. I don't know what love can do, but be supportive. But what was nice about the article is basically said that some of these moms now are going to Cannabis doctors.

Nina Simmons:
Oh yeah. So the article featured our Cannabis doctor, Dr. Shin, and said that she's been treating hunger. Dr. Chen. Yeah. Thanks for everything. Love you. She has been treating moms with Cannabis to help them deal with their postpartum depression. She said in the article stated that mom coming into the office either sobbing or having these blank stares. And it's funny, Walgreen and I think I see a lot of moms like that even in the pediatrician's office, like they have this weight is a what just happening one day. I'm, you know, me and they now make a mom as I am dealing with all these possibilities, like what happens if you have a blank look harvest from the sleep deprivation, sleep being sleep deprived. So basically what these moms are going to do. Dr. Shanna, other Cannabis doctors and gain a specific strand specific. Met tinctures to help them with their depression.

Osiris Stephen:
So it's not just a matter of vaping or identity now you do always so to give it any kind of form to help them.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. Exactly.

Nina Simmons:
Ok, so it's not that they're smoking it. Some can depending on which state they're in. They can, but they're getting it and are basically an oil form. And this is not moms. These moms are not just going to the black market and getting it from someone they don't know. They don't know what it is. They are getting it. They're using it for medical use. Yeah. Okay.

Nina Simmons:
So then again, a prescription and has been helping them.

Osiris Stephen:
Now they're dependent, you say, under the, you know, your medical marijuana program.

Nina Simmons:
This would qualify. Good question.

Osiris Stephen:
If if say they would be, what would qualify, would it not?

Nina Simmons:
No. So what Dr. Sheen said in her article is that most mothers, after they give birth, are in pain. So they're getting she using it under the chronic pain diagnosis. OK. Yeah. So they're getting it under that diagnosis. Well played. Yeah. Yeah, well played. And it is helping them just now. Once some moms come in and they can even touch their babies and they come up for the follow up and they're actually holding their babies, which is huge.

Osiris Stephen:
Yes. Big because you need that connection, mother. In the beginning. Yeah. In that connection. Oh, oh, oh.

Osiris Stephen:
You moms out there, you know, look into it. You're not recommending. But we're just saying you need some help out there, you know, gnosis and keep it too. So go out there and get as much help as you can. You know, because raising a child is not easy. And those first few years are so important with the connection between you and that child.

Nina Simmons:
And a lot of these mothers were mothers out already given antidepressants.

Osiris Stephen:
That's strange. Did they would something like that, a medication that while they're nursing to without someone nosing somewhere in nursing? Yes. But I'm thinking for a parent, a mother keeps a pair, but a mother who's nursing and is taking this medication, which is sometimes can be a narcotic and could be addicted, was a lot easier than. Yes. So are they passing that down to if there's nursing lactating? Are they passing on to the child?

Osiris Stephen:
Does the channel. You know, those are things you've got to think about. You know, in a sense, I mean, if you look at the plant itself, you're losing Cannabis using a plant. It's not addictive.

Nina Simmons:
Oh, she did say that in the article. Yeah. And there were also some naysayers in the articles, too, that Dena. you're going to have them. So they said the same thing, almost the same lines like, oh, isn't may not be safe for nursing mothers. Oh yeah. But it's okay to pop a few pills though. Yeah. So go figure. His big back and forth. Pope that there are mothers who are using it. They're using it for medical use. They have a diagnosis course. Of course depression is a diagnosis. I want to talk to that. So there's so many strands of Cannabis out there that you have to find if you use it.

Nina Simmons:
That's why it's nice to have Cannabis doctor, because they can help you find the strands that go work for you. Mm hmm. So a lot of you will tell me, oh, if I may say to a friend, a close friend, hey, why don't you try the Cannabis to help me with this?

Nina Simmons:
You're like, oh, no, weed makes me sick. Or are we? I don't want to get the munchies.

Nina Simmons:
But there's a of yours, and I'm so sick of it. I just am so sick of this type of stereotypes like this.

Nina Simmons:
I find like because of these stereotypes, people are so hesitant. Well, they're trying.

Osiris Stephen:
Even medically, I think it's more or less a stigma there. Free stigma. But they have no problem with a doctor. Hey, could you prescribe me some pills? Yes. But knowing that there's major side effects of those pills because there's so many strands out there.

Nina Simmons:
Yes, there are some Cannabis trends that give you the munchies. Yes. Well, and there are some that make you sleepy, but you could find ones that actually could help you medically and no one would know that you're using it.

Osiris Stephen:
Well, look, I mean, for the most part, we haven't given any brand or any company, any, you know, light. But, I mean, for a library of strands and trying to understand, we'll say first thing to do, check leaflet as elite AFL wide leaflet com. Their website has all of the strands you can imagine. And they also give you a description of what these dreams are good for and they're even separate under categories as well. So for you knew people who, you know, thought about it, you know, as we call it, kind of curious, you know, definitely check it out and see what would work. And there are also some companies out there that they're coming out with DNA testing to match your DNA up with a specific strain for your particular ailment. So look out for those as well, because we actually use one. But that would be a discussion at a later date about this particular company that I have actually had a great discussion with and also checked out their products here legally is amazing site.

Nina Simmons:
So you can type in a certain strand or just click on a certain one and they'll tell you this is great for leaving depression. This is for euphoria. This is for sleep.

Nina Simmons:
So, you know, our focus is for the guests.

Osiris Stephen:
You New Yorkers got to stay focused on that grind.

Nina Simmons:
Most people think of weed as just making you like a zombie, but that's not the case now as Indica.

Nina Simmons:
So you got it. Most people, when they did say they smoked in college or high school, they didn't know what they were smoking.

Osiris Stephen:
Yeah, they just got it from their friend who got it from another friend that puts it, which is a huge. No, no. But that was back then. Yeah, I know. But now I think wouldn't so much information out there now I'm just overwhelmed to the point. It's exhausting to go through all of it. But at the same time, you realize that this industry is picking up so much momentum that, you know, you can't say I'm not educated enough.

Osiris Stephen:
And she can't you can ignore this is not an answer or something acceptable anymore because there's so much information.

Nina Simmons:
There is, but I don't know if people are really getting into that information out there.

Osiris Stephen:
That's interesting because they won't go when they go to a doctor, get a prescription for a pill. They won't question it. They, like my doctor, say it was OK, despite the fact that you get some side effects I like. But my doctor said. But now you're getting no alternative. You're going to question it. And yet so many people are using to help us. I'm even the baby boomers are like almost the number one beneficiaries of Cannabis now. How amazing is that? The people who are up against it back there and now the ones who are using it now? Go figure.

Nina Simmons:
But it's nice that they can be educated and counter pick out. What? Strands they need to fit their need, their needs.

But to go back to the postpartum I mean, for you personally, because I know that you and I have had gone through it and dealing with it.

Osiris Stephen:
I don't think we've ever really sat down and talked about you. Are you still going through it at this moment? I can calculate. You're feeling overwhelmed. You're feeling anxious. And I wonder, is that still part of that?

Nina Simmons:
I don't know. I mean, I think by definition is only one year time.

Nina Simmons:
So I you put a time and so at the right. So after that is what I considered like just plain old depressed, I guess.

Osiris Stephen:
Well, could it be considered PTSD?

Nina Simmons:
I will give him added stress. Yeah. Giving birth is genetic.

Osiris Stephen:
I mean, when I was in the hospital with you, when you given birth and all these hands were going to head to pulling will eat an out. And I'm like, oh, this is this is different. This is interesting me to watch his life come from you. And the fact that you're sitting there breathing, heavy pushing. I mean, it was messy. That's all I could see was like, OK, I've watched a lot of horror movies in my life. The blood, gore and everything else. But to witness something like that, life or life to come from you is like it's an eye opener. He doesn't expect that.

Nina Simmons:
It's pretty set sensitive of you and in tune to actually say that was like a pea. Yes. Because it is like every mother has a birth story and some.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, it is traumatic. Like some of them, you know, themselves get sick or they have health issues. They had to be rushed to the ICU. Giving birth is very, very traumatic. And yet that should be considered post-traumatic stress. Like, that's interesting. Yes. No, you're right. Yeah.

Osiris Stephen:
Because I mean, just look at it cause you're putting your body. I mean, it's one thing when like let's say now we'll put examples of working out. You're exerting certain muscles, you're pushing you beyond your limits.

Osiris Stephen:
I mean, even like running marathons, you you know, you're pushing about, but you're you're exerting so much energy to push a child anywhere between four. You know, you have a small preemie, but anywhere between four to eight to 10 pounds, maybe out of you. That takes a lot. I mean, literally this time where you stop breathing just to exert enough energy to force the child out.

Osiris Stephen:
You could literally have a heart attack. You could really stop. You could have an annual I mean, all these things can happen to use E and it is risky.

Nina Simmons:
And if it is risky in some, I was very fortunate that mine was quick. But some women are in there for like forty eight seven.

Osiris Stephen:
I mean that's amazing. And big up to all the mothers out there for the journey you guys gone through to get that checked out. I mean it's on real.

Osiris Stephen:
It is really it's just respect and love. That's all I can say. Respect and love.

Nina Simmons:
And now you say that that probably contributes to the Post depression.

Osiris Stephen:
Yeah. To put it bluntly, I mean, because you think about it, you're using all of your hormones in your body, all of the energy, every thought, everything is about this process. So all of it is now coming to one action and as to get the child out. You you're exerting everything and anything. So are you talking even on a cellular level that, you know, all this is this purpose? Now, here we are all coming together to get this off. I mean, everything's running in high gear now to get to this point that that's that's just amazing.

Nina Simmons:
As I say, bless you and thank you. And thanks to the boys who got there. Yes.

Nina Simmons:
So to kind of change it upside and preparing for his podcast, this also happens in men. Really? Yeah. What? Postpartum depression in men.

Osiris Stephen:
Get at it.

Osiris Stephen:
I saw that from a six pack or a vape pen.

Osiris Stephen:
I didn't notice this w.

Nina Simmons:
I mean, look, it's up yet. So some men get it as well. Can you see that?

Osiris Stephen:
I'm trying to. The only impression I have is when, you know you know, the shop's closed for the night. I mean, I don't know.

Osiris Stephen:
I'd be lying to him with it. I don't know. That's strange. I. I'm trying to wrap my head about it if I've ever been depressed. I mean, stressed out. But to go through postpartum. I mean, I thought I saw something about that.

Osiris Stephen:
But I'm like that. I can't be for guys. I mean, you know, it also. But for guys, you know, personally, me, we mask a lot of things that we do go through because we got to be strong because, you know, society tells you you gotta be strong, you gotta be focused, you gotta be all these things and be manly. So depression is not one of those things that you deal with as a man, let alone your health sometimes. I example. So for me to think that as a man that I'm going through postpartum depression.

Osiris Stephen:
No, I went to depression for the nine months you were pregnant, but that's about it.

Osiris Stephen:
But I mean, after the fact. I mean, is is it after the birth or is it.

Nina Simmons:
I mean, so basically going through it at the same time their wives are going through it. But really, I don't know. It's not her moral base, but it's just basically. Anxiety. Some guys are just having the new baby around for the sense of anxiety or stress or this sense that now they had to step up.

Nina Simmons:
You know.

Osiris Stephen:
Well, for me, personally, stepping up is not so much an issue because I was the oldest of my family. So any younger siblings that responsibly fell on me. So I. So for me, I couldn't see that. It's just like, OK, everything has to be scheduled. And plus, my mom ran a household like military. She didn't have to be there to have things. And what she would see something out of place. She would know exactly who did it and when she was on point.

Osiris Stephen:
So that in a sense, for me, it's is order. So, I mean, for you guys, I going through it. I feel for you. But I can't see that I went through that.

Osiris Stephen:
You know, I'd say I'm super man and it's just I didn't see it for me.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, I mean, I can see it happening. Definitely. You notice the change in the shift. Maybe they're not getting all the attention at all.

Nina Simmons:
Oh, yeah. Anything. I don't know.

Osiris Stephen:
I mean, I didn't go to that for a while with you. Yes.

Osiris Stephen:
When

Osiris Stephen:
You leave you. When this little guy came in and took complete control of the household, I'm like, wow, OK. So I am going to be playing second or even maybe third fiddle to your attention. But I dealt with it, you know, I realize it. But at the same time, you know, that's part of being a parent. You know, the things that did things that you want may not be necessary was the family's need. Yeah. So, you know, I learned to put that aside. You know, I'm so salty, but I think we've grown through that. I mean, I have grown through it.

Osiris Stephen:
But really, it's just amazing. Did not know you learn something new every time.

So men can go through postpartum as a patient thing, I guess is the thing.

Osiris Stephen:
Wow. But I mean, something like, you know, the medical feel that they want to slap a label on anything, but I'll go with it. I won't.

Nina Simmons:
But I don't know how many men are going and seeking help. I don't know. I just saw that as very, very, very my search was very minimal. I just kind of looked it up. So I cannot speak on how many. And you know what? What are they doing for it? If anything, Cannabis. Yes. You have to put it out there if anyone else out there wants to look it up.

Osiris Stephen:
It's funny, you know, that I've got a reason to go use the press. Let me get a Cannabis. But wow, guys.

Osiris Stephen:
nina.. Give on my guys out there. Hug me. Yeah, we do. We do. Men. That is interesting. I'm gonna I'm have to do some research on that because that is really, really interesting. I guess we got to add something else to the medical marijuana programs out there.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah, definitely. So I think. Know any other questions for me? Sighs Oh, really? If you have any questions. OK.

Osiris Stephen:
No, not really.

Osiris Stephen:
But I think for the most part, I'm learning a whole lot through this because, you know, as a couple, our communication can be challenging at times. So I think doing this helps me get a better idea of the things that you've gone through, the things that you're dealing with and how we can work together and, you know, just basically working things out.

Osiris Stephen:
So I will be. So what's the word that you like to use?

Osiris Stephen:
Insensitive. Insensitive doesn't seem so harsh. And I'm a sensitive person. So that's this.

Nina Simmons:
It hurts. Sorry.

Osiris Stephen:
Does that even sound like you're really genuine about that? But no, I mean, I pride myself on being a sensitive person.

Osiris Stephen:
And you tell me that I'm insensitive. So it's. Well, I got it. I got to do a self-evaluation. How's that? Sure.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. Do a evaluation that we all need to do a self evaluation.

Osiris Stephen:
Oh, yeah. You admitted to that. Yeah. Oh, I've got a checklist. I've been waiting to use it.

Osiris Stephen:
But anyway, guys, this has been a interesting topic discussion because as men sometimes we don't think about these things. And plus, it's not something that's really talked about on with men is mostly something that's kept women. So this is really good to know.

Nina Simmons:
And I think it's good to people know that they have options out there. And it's not only about Cannabis and epilepsy.

Osiris Stephen:
Yes, not. It's just so much and I mean, we promote Cannabis, but not in a sense like, hey, you know, drop everything you're doing is running Cannabis. Not that just think it could help some medical condition, but it would mean more or less they may do things educationally now. Yeah, because there is alternatives as options.

Osiris Stephen:
And that's that's really what our message is, is just again, like we always said, you know, be empowered, you know, that's decimal thing because when you empower it, you can make decisions. You can look at altered as you don't necessarily have to take what you know, someone with a white coat tells you. It's just always just like, hey, you know what? I've been doing some research. I need to think things out, you know, because you know your body, you know your family better than anybody else.

Nina Simons & Osiris Stephen:
Yeah. So what should we discuss the next episode? I don't know so much, but I think.

Osiris Stephen:
For next episode, let's talk about the things that we've done with Aiden. OK. Because, you know, especially with as we you guys already know about his condition, everything but to talk about the things that we do with him to help them overcome some of his, you know, his shortcomings, I mean, because of his disabilities or limited limitations, he's overcoming some certain things that we find amazing at times. So we definitely want to share that with you. At some point, we probably create some blogs that you guys can see it for yourselves, because like I said once before, it's like almost re working his brain.

Nina Simons & Osiris Stephen:
It's like we like it. And I think we didn't get a chance to get into that the last time.

Osiris Stephen:
But I think next time I think we could get into that. And I love it.

Nina Simmons:
Yeah. Yeah. That's your field. But I mean, I it's it's amazing when you see children at a certain age and they can actually do things that you don't expect and do any do and overcome it. Champion says all I can say, they're champions. Yes.

Nina Simmons:
All right, folks. OK. That is it. Thank you.

Nina Simons & Osiris Stephen:
Now. Yeah. Guys, have a good one. All right.

Nina Simons & Osiris Stephen:
Thanks for tuning in to another episode of Love and Cannabis. I nina, and im osiris we're the proud parents of and be strong and stay empowered.

Quickly and accurately convert audio to text with Sonix.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp3). Easily convert your mp3 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2019—it's fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp3 to text, try Sonix today.

Cannabis Podcast Network